Purim Party at Ludwig Satz’s House in Sea Gate, Brooklyn, ca. 1925. American Jewish Historical Society.Yiddish Theater actors, among them Celia Adler, at a Purim party. The Purim party took place at Ludwig Satz’s house in Sea Gate Brooklyn, ca. 1925. The boy in front is the son of Celia Adler and Lazar Freed (also a Yiddish theater actor). From the Celia Adler Papers.For more, visit the Center for Jewish History’s Flickr photostream.Click here to connect with the Center for Jewish History on Facebook.

Purim Party at Ludwig Satz’s House in Sea Gate, Brooklyn, ca. 1925. American Jewish Historical Society.

Yiddish Theater actors, among them Celia Adler, at a Purim party. The Purim party took place at Ludwig Satz’s house in Sea Gate Brooklyn, ca. 1925. The boy in front is the son of Celia Adler and Lazar Freed (also a Yiddish theater actor). From the Celia Adler Papers.

For more, visit the Center for Jewish History’s Flickr photostream.
Click here to connect with the Center for Jewish History on Facebook.

Holiday Hamentaschen
by J.D. Arden, by J.D. Arden, M.L.I.S. candidate, Reference Services Research Intern, Center for Jewish History

Reading up on the history of Purim in this previous blog post "Chag Purim!" may inspire a healthy appetite or even an interest in trying out some holiday recipes yourself. Here are a couple suggestions: classic hamantaschen, of course (with some illustrations to help you make a perfectly folded baked cookie), and a Sephardic & Israeli variation of “Orejas de Haman”—אוזֿוס די המן—meaning Haman’s eyes, or “Oznai Haman”—אוזני המן—meaning Haman’s ears. The Sephardic recipe is fried in oil and is open to your own interpretation of any creative shape that you can think of to represent a tasty “ear” to nosh!

Sources used:

99 Things You Always Wanted to Know about Jewish Cooking But Were Afraid to Ask (Jewish Fellowship of Davis, 1970)

The Jewish Holiday Cookbook: An International Collection of Recipes and Customs (Greene, Gloria K., Times Books, 1985)

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Das Narrenschneiden (Fool Surgery)

This intriguing Purim play was put on in Berlin in 1938. You don’t have to travel nearly as far to get a fun and child-friendly performance, however, thanks to the Summer Sundays Series at the Center.

This weekend at 11:30 am, join Jacob Stein and The Bakery Band Puppets for a hilarious journey through traditional and contemporary Jewish culture. Includes original and classic tunes that are guaranteed to get you out of your seat and dancing along to a lively performance of puppetry, music and storytelling.

Photo credit: Leo Baeck Institute, 1 and 2