Using the Archives to Reflect on Your Hanukkah Experience

by David P. Rosenberg, Senior Reference Librarian - Collections, Center for Jewish History 

image
Hanukkah Lamp. Galicia or Ukraine, ca. 1800. Silver: cast, filigree, engraved. The Max Stern Collection, Yeshiva University Museum. This lamp is of the Ba’al Shem Tov type, named after the founder of Hasidism, who, tradition tells us, owned a Hanukkah lamp of this type. This made it very popular in the Ukraine and in Poland.

The Debate Over Hanukkah

Hanukkah, the “festival of lights,” has been the issue of debate in scholarly circles. Many argue that the holiday became important only in the 20th century. Dianne Ashton claims that “it achieved its current popularity in the 1950s” (see the chapter “Hanukkah Songs of the 1950s”). Louis Finkelstein’s review of Oliver Shaw Rankin’s The Origins of the Festival of Hanukkah, the Jewish New-Age Festival begins with the question: “Was Hanukkah originally a nature festival to which historical significance became attached only in comparatively late times? Absurd as this question may seem to the uninitiated, it has seriously occupied the minds of scholars” (p. 169-173; article available on JSTOR and accessible on-site at the Center).

According to Rabbi John Rosove, there was recently a discussion titled “Reinvention of Hanukkah in the 20th Century: A Jewish Cultural Civil War between Zionists, Liberal American Judaism and Habad — Who Are the Children of Light and Who of Darkness?” It was led by Noam Zion, a fellow and senior educator at the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem, and presented to forty rabbis of the Southern California Board of Rabbis.

Hanukkah’s Cultural Importance

Regardless of the origins of the holiday’s popularity, it is an unavoidable fact that Hanukkah is significant in American Jewish life today. Ira M. Sheskin uses local surveys to outline a concept of the modern American Jew that includes Hanukkah celebration as an element of identity. Lighting Hanukkah candles is listed beside having a mezuzah on the front door, lighting Shabbat candles and keeping kosher. Within the context of American Jewish life, Hanukkah celebration is named—along with the Passover seder—“one of the most commonly practiced Jewish rituals” (p. 78).

Examining Views of Hanukkah Through Music

The cultural importance of Hanukkah goes far beyond lighting candles. The collections of the American Jewish Historical Society here at the Center are great places to start learning about the evolution of the modern observance of the holiday. For example, Dianne Ashton traces the musical culture of Hanukkah through songbooks. She states that in 1918, The Jewish Songster went through three printings in its first year and contained a variety of languages. There were seven Hanukkah songs in it, and the work as a whole focused on “transmitting traditional values and religious knowledge.”

Ashton goes on to examine how people observed the festival of Hanukkah as a holiday that not only commemorated the rededication of the temple in Jerusalem, but also celebrated the defeat of an attempt to destroy Jewish reigion and culture. “Soon after World War II, American Jews embraced Hanukkah as a celebration of religious liberty whose meaning, they felt, embraced America’s defeat of Nazism,” she writes (p. 83).

How Plays About Hanukkah Connect the Jewish Past and Present

Plays written about Hanukkah are also illuminating sources for insight into the culture of this holiday celebration. One gem from the collections housed at the Center—a copy of Pictures out of the past from 1918—still has the names “Sarah,” “Irving” and “Florance” penciled into it to indicate that these people will play the characters of “Esther,” “David” and “Helen.”

A few pages into the play’s action, the Mother asks “Chanukah? Who keeps Chanukah? I have Jewish neighbors and I have not heard the mention of Chanukah for years! We live so far from the Temple – and besides, nobody goes these days!” (p. 9).

The dialog continues when David makes a poignant statement “Aw, Kanukah ain’t no giant! It’s the Jewish Christmas, ain’t it, grandma?” (p. 11).

Other plays present vastly different attitudes toward the holiday. Louis Lipsky, the American Zionist leader, journalist—author and founder of the Keren Hayesod, the Jewish Agency, and the American and World Jewish Congresses—penned Vice-Versa: a Chanukah play for Purim in 1907. The front matter states that the play was written “with a view to stimulating Zionist societies in America to undertake work of a similar nature in their own cities.”

The political motivations of the work are clear: “…but that’s no Purim song!… Introducer: We know it ain’t but (turns to the company, and with them): Aleph, Beth, Gimel, Daled, Hay, Vov, ZION ZION! Father what does that mean?… Zionist Fellers! We are the boys who believe in Zion, Zion!” (p. 12).

Digging Deeper Into the Archival Collections

The National Jewish Welfare Board records held by AJHS document the Board’s “evolution from an organization founded in 1917 to provide support for soldiers in times of war to an agency involved in all aspects of Jewish life both in the United States and abroad. In 1990 JWB recreated itself as the Jewish Community Centers Association of North America.”

The finding aid explains there is a sub-series dedicated to holiday files. Two large boxes of these files (boxes 167 and 168) are dedicated to Hanukkah. One can see the folders dedicated to Arts, Illustrations, Decorations, Bulletins, Manuals, and Program Material in the form of Plays, Poetry, Arts projects, Music and more.

One undated pamphlet—Let’s enjoy Chanukah, Games, Songs, Recipes, Decorations—has a crossword puzzle, songs, dances, instructions for making decorations, and gift suggestions for children, including “Chanukah in Song--Album of 2 unbreakable records $3.15; Set of 4 unbreakable records Halutzim, Trip to Israel, Animal Friends, Good Morning about $0.39 each.”

There is also a short summary of the story of Chanukah and a statement of the holiday’s significance: “Chanukah symbolizes the Jewish people’s struggle for freedom, particularly for religious freedom which is considered a fundamental right of men in a democratic world.”

The Jewish Education Committee’s arts and crafts guide in the “Jewish festivals series” explains how to make a clay menorah for Hanukkah. A booklet The Hanukah program manual for Young adults and adults put out by the Jewish Center Division of the National Jewish Welfare board has history, stories, a retelling of the commemoration of Hanukkah in the Warsaw Ghetto, dramatics, poems, games, quiz programs, and arts and crafts.

Some of the Hanukah greetings archived were sent via V-Mail, including a greeting depicting a soldier with a shield and menorah that reads: “The spirit of the Maccabee lives on…Hanukah Greetings from the Persian Gulf Service Command.”

Hanukkah Americana

The Hanukkah book elaborates on popular ways to celebrate Hanukkah in 1975. The section on “Festivities at Home” includes a segment on parties and decorations. One paper cut design was based on the “pomegranate, star and wreath motifs on the Kfar Nahum synagogue” (p. 65).

There are also instructions and a diagram for a Hanukkiah made out of a soft drink can. The one pictured is made out of a “7 Up” soda can with the caption “Hanukkiah with a pun” (p. 49). Another Hanukkiah pictured has the candle holders made out of small Statues of Liberty (p. 46).

Beauty in holiness has a chapter devoted to old Hanukkah lamps. The article by Franz Landsberger contains illustrations of many beautiful Hanukkah candelabrum, including a silver 18th-century example with great detail on the branches, mimicking leaves of a tree.

Learn More

These are just a few examples of the treasures that you can find in the archives and collections housed at the Center for Jewish History. Join us in exploring the Jewish past by conducting your own search at search.cjh.org or sending us an inquiry at inquiries@cjh.org.

Yom Yerushalayim: Selections

In Honor of Yom Yerushalayim: five selections concerning Jerusalem from each of the five partners.

Compiled by David P. Rosenberg, M.P.A., Senior Reference Librarian - Collections, Center for Jewish History 

Yom Yerushalayim commemorates the reunification of Jerusalem and Israeli control over the Old City. The victory in the Six-Day War resulted in the first time Jews took control of the city since the destruction of the Second Temple by the Romans nearly 1,900 years before the 1967 watershed event. 

American Jewish Historical Society

American Sephardi Federation

Leo Baeck Institute

Yeshiva University Museum

YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

For more resources, see this blog entry: "In celebration of Yom Ha’atzmaut (Israel Independence Day): two books and an archival collection, relating to Israel, from each of our five partners."

Click on the images above to see enlarged versions for easier viewing/reading.

At the Sewing Machine (from Songs of the Ghetto)

Poem by Morris Rosenfeld (1862-1923) with translation from Yiddish by Berthold Feiwel (1875-1937). Illustration by Ephraim Moses Lilien (1874-1925). 

Berlin, Benjamin Harz Verlag ca. 1902.

Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (1996.023). Gift of Michael Cohn.

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A haunting image from the famed and groundbreaking Zionist artist Ephraim Moses Lilien sits next to a poem about what it was like for workers in one of the most common occupations for Jews at the end of the 19th and into the early 20th century: sewing. Work at the sewing machine, “Day after day,” and “Year after year” was indeed an occupation, but certainly not a healthy one, as poet Morris Rosenfeld and Lilien seem to argue. Rather, it was a way of working that ultimately robbed the body of its spirit, its vim and its vigor! This piece appeared in the intensely beautiful book, Lieder des Ghetto (Songs of the Ghetto), a poetic and graphic piece of from a Zionist point of view against what they saw as the spiritually and physically impoverished state of Jews in the Diaspora. 

This book is currently displayed in YU Museum’s exhibition here at the Center, Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine, 1860 – 1960, on view through August 2012. Click here to find out more about the show.

Submitted by Zachary Levine, Yeshiva University Museum.

Die Haggadah des Kindes. (Click on title to view digitized version.) Leo Baeck Institute.
Dayenu: A few Passover Haggadot would have been enough…really?by David P. Rosenberg, M.P.A., Senior Reference Librarian - Collections, Center for Jewish History 
As we prepare for the ritual Seder this evening, I started to reflect on the variations of Passover Haggadot and the vast number of them that we have in the collections at the Center for Jewish History. Each of the five partners of the Center has the liturgy in many variations.
The Haggadah is “probably the most widely used text of the Jewish people” according to the Encyclopedia of Judaism (p.1052), which states that “with the exception of some popular folk songs and some local elaborations of the established text, inserted at the end, [the text] remained almost intact from geonic times until the nineteenth century” (p.1053).
In fact, when looking at the Soncino English translation of the Talmud that we have in the reference collection, the Mishnayos listed in the last chapter of Pesachim contain the highlights of the ritual. Cecil Roth’s Jewish Art has extensive passages on Illuminated Haggadot with regard to the illumination of Hebrew manuscripts in the Middle Ages and in the Renaissance section. It explains that the Haggadah was popular for illustration because it is a relatively small but widely popular work. One edition mentioned is The Sarajevo Haggadah.
The American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research and Yeshiva University Museum have copies of a facsimile of the Sarajevo Haggadah. The AJHS copy, The Sarajevo Haggadah, also contains text by Cecil Roth: “The Sarajevo Haggadah and its significance in the history of art.” The Yeshiva University Museum holds other illustrated Haggadot including Pages from Haggadah created by Eliezer Zusman Magrytsh, 1831-1832, Call number 1974.001. Select pages of this work are available online; click here.
The following are more selections from each partner of the Center. Click on the listed item to view its bibliographic record or, when available, the digitized version that is available online.
Yeshiva University Museum
Chagall’s Passover Haggadah, 1987.
The Moss Haggadah: a complete reproduction of the Haggadah written and illuminated by David Moss for Richard and Beatrice Levy, with the commentary of the artist, 1990.
Haggadah and woodcut: an introduction to the Passover Haggadah completed by Gershom Cohen in Prague, Sunday, 26 Teveth, 5287 (Dec. 30, 1526) by Charles Wengrov, 1967.
Yeshiva University Museum holds many ritual items, such as a silver and enamel Seder plate created by the artist Albert Dov Sigal. 
Leo Baeck Institute
The Offenbacher Haggadah, illustrated by Fritz Kredel, has been digitized and is available online.
Another work—which is in Hebrew and includes a German translation—is also available online: Hagadah le-Yeladim=Die Haggadah des Kindes.
The LBI has numerous other works in their repository spanning a large period of time, including Seder Hagadah shel Pesah: im perush yafeh ṿe-tsiyurim naim, Amsterdam, 1711 or 1712.
I also found an 1846 Prague work entitled Seder Marbeh le-saper ṿe-hu Hagadah shel Pesah. It has heavily stained pages, “possibly by food.” 
There are also many other Passover-related works held by LBI, some of them Haggadot and others books on the liturgy, such as Haggadah and history: a panorama in facsimile of five centuries of the printed Haggadah from the collections of Harvard University and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America by Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi, 1975.
LBI also holds the 1955 selection, Which is the oldest woodcut Haggadah?
American Sephardi Federation 
The American Sephardi Federation has many relevant works, including: A Sephardic Passover Haggadah: with translation and commentary prepared by Marc D. Angel, 1988.
Seder Hagadah shel Pesah: The Amsterdam Haggadah of 1662 is a reprint of an illustrated Haggadah published in Amsterdam in 1662 with a commentary by Rabbi Joseph of Padua. This work has instructions in three languages on how to conduct the Seder; the Judeo-Italian instructions are in the right-hand column, the Yiddish in the center, and the Ladino on the left-hand side.
There is also a digital recording available online: Saady’s recordings of Haggadah and others, date unknown, recorded in Hebrew and/or Ladino.
YIVO Institute for Jewish Research
There are over 500 results in the YIVO library catalog for “Haggadah.”
One is the Sefer Zevah Pesah, 1557. The book includes text of the Haggadah, and it was part of the Strashun Library Collection in Vilna (today Vilnius, capital city of Lithuania). The Library was confiscated by the Nazis in 1941 and shipped to Frankfurt in Germany to be part of the future Institute for the Research of the Extinct Jewish People, planned by Alfred Rosenberg, Hitler’s chief Nazi ideologue and Head of the Reich Ministry for the Occupied Eastern Territories. The Strashun Collection, along with the YIVO Vilna collections, were liberated by the American Army, and re-patriated to YIVO in New York in April 1947. The work has been digitized, and it is available online; click here to view. 
Seder Hagadah shel Pesah bi-leshon ha-kodesh u-fitrono bi-leshon Italyano is from Rome, 1609, with text in Judeo-Italian & Hebrew, and now on microfiche. 
Seder Hagadah shel Pesaḥ im perush Abarabanel from Fürth, 1755. This book was also part of the Strashun Library and has been digitized; click here to view. 
The more contemporary YIVO holdings reflect many changes in the face of modernity. These include:
Let my people stay!: Hagode for an immigrant justice seder. Los Angeles : Workmen’s Circle / Arbeter Ring, 2007.
The women’s Passover companion: women’s reflections on the festival of freedom, 2003 
The freedom seder: a new Haggadah for Passover by Arthur I. Waskow, 1970. This is “an updated, radicalized version of the traditional seder text.” (This is also held by the American Jewish Historical Society.)
American Jewish Historical Society
AJHS holds the Arthur I. Waskow papers, P-152. The finding aid contains details on the collection, including how there is a folder on “Seders inspired by Waskow’s work.” Perhaps the annual Passover Seder held by President Obama should be mentioned. (For more on “the Obama Seder,” click here.)
AJHS also has an array of Haggadot encompassing both modern and traditional varieties. There are over 500 keyword matches when you search the catalog. Works that I found interesting include:
The “First American edition.” Service for the two first nights of the Passover: in Hebrew and English / According to the German & Spanish Jews. Translated into English by the late David Levi, of London, 1836.
The revised Hagada with musical notes, 1898.
Hagadah, the narrative of Israel’s redemption from Egypt: Seder ritual for Passover-eve, 1933.
The new American Haggadah Reconstructionist, 1999.
The Chassidic Haggadah: An anthology of commentary and stories for the seder, 1988.
Hagadah shel Pesah: Seder for Soviet Jewry, 1968.
Haggadah for Jews and Buddhists, 2006.
This represents just a small selection of the Haggadot that can be found in the partners’ collections here at the Center. I encourage you to explore these works and conduct your own searches of the collections (by clicking here). The Haggadot and Passover-related works housed here at the Center will prove varied and thought-provoking resources for your own Passover celebrations and reflections. 

Die Haggadah des Kindes. (Click on title to view digitized version.) Leo Baeck Institute.

Dayenu: A few Passover Haggadot would have been enough…really?
by David P. Rosenberg, M.P.A., Senior Reference Librarian - Collections, Center for Jewish History 

As we prepare for the ritual Seder this evening, I started to reflect on the variations of Passover Haggadot and the vast number of them that we have in the collections at the Center for Jewish History. Each of the five partners of the Center has the liturgy in many variations.

The Haggadah is “probably the most widely used text of the Jewish people” according to the Encyclopedia of Judaism (p.1052), which states that “with the exception of some popular folk songs and some local elaborations of the established text, inserted at the end, [the text] remained almost intact from geonic times until the nineteenth century” (p.1053).

In fact, when looking at the Soncino English translation of the Talmud that we have in the reference collection, the Mishnayos listed in the last chapter of Pesachim contain the highlights of the ritual. Cecil Roth’s Jewish Art has extensive passages on Illuminated Haggadot with regard to the illumination of Hebrew manuscripts in the Middle Ages and in the Renaissance section. It explains that the Haggadah was popular for illustration because it is a relatively small but widely popular work. One edition mentioned is The Sarajevo Haggadah.

The American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research and Yeshiva University Museum have copies of a facsimile of the Sarajevo Haggadah. The AJHS copy, The Sarajevo Haggadah, also contains text by Cecil Roth: “The Sarajevo Haggadah and its significance in the history of art.” The Yeshiva University Museum holds other illustrated Haggadot including Pages from Haggadah created by Eliezer Zusman Magrytsh, 1831-1832, Call number 1974.001. Select pages of this work are available online; click here.

The following are more selections from each partner of the Center. Click on the listed item to view its bibliographic record or, when available, the digitized version that is available online.

Yeshiva University Museum

Chagall’s Passover Haggadah, 1987.

The Moss Haggadah: a complete reproduction of the Haggadah written and illuminated by David Moss for Richard and Beatrice Levy, with the commentary of the artist, 1990.

Haggadah and woodcut: an introduction to the Passover Haggadah completed by Gershom Cohen in Prague, Sunday, 26 Teveth, 5287 (Dec. 30, 1526) by Charles Wengrov, 1967.

Yeshiva University Museum holds many ritual items, such as a silver and enamel Seder plate created by the artist Albert Dov Sigal

Leo Baeck Institute

The Offenbacher Haggadah, illustrated by Fritz Kredel, has been digitized and is available online.

Another work—which is in Hebrew and includes a German translation—is also available online: Hagadah le-Yeladim=Die Haggadah des Kindes.

The LBI has numerous other works in their repository spanning a large period of time, including Seder Hagadah shel Pesah: im perush yafeh ṿe-tsiyurim naim, Amsterdam, 1711 or 1712.

I also found an 1846 Prague work entitled Seder Marbeh le-saper ṿe-hu Hagadah shel Pesah. It has heavily stained pages, “possibly by food.” 

There are also many other Passover-related works held by LBI, some of them Haggadot and others books on the liturgy, such as Haggadah and history: a panorama in facsimile of five centuries of the printed Haggadah from the collections of Harvard University and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America by Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi, 1975.

LBI also holds the 1955 selection, Which is the oldest woodcut Haggadah?

American Sephardi Federation 

The American Sephardi Federation has many relevant works, including: A Sephardic Passover Haggadah: with translation and commentary prepared by Marc D. Angel, 1988.

Seder Hagadah shel Pesah: The Amsterdam Haggadah of 1662 is a reprint of an illustrated Haggadah published in Amsterdam in 1662 with a commentary by Rabbi Joseph of Padua. This work has instructions in three languages on how to conduct the Seder; the Judeo-Italian instructions are in the right-hand column, the Yiddish in the center, and the Ladino on the left-hand side.

There is also a digital recording available online: Saady’s recordings of Haggadah and others, date unknown, recorded in Hebrew and/or Ladino.

YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

There are over 500 results in the YIVO library catalog for “Haggadah.”

One is the Sefer Zevah Pesah, 1557. The book includes text of the Haggadah, and it was part of the Strashun Library Collection in Vilna (today Vilnius, capital city of Lithuania). The Library was confiscated by the Nazis in 1941 and shipped to Frankfurt in Germany to be part of the future Institute for the Research of the Extinct Jewish People, planned by Alfred Rosenberg, Hitler’s chief Nazi ideologue and Head of the Reich Ministry for the Occupied Eastern Territories. The Strashun Collection, along with the YIVO Vilna collections, were liberated by the American Army, and re-patriated to YIVO in New York in April 1947. The work has been digitized, and it is available online; click here to view. 

Seder Hagadah shel Pesah bi-leshon ha-kodesh u-fitrono bi-leshon Italyano is from Rome, 1609, with text in Judeo-Italian & Hebrew, and now on microfiche. 

Seder Hagadah shel Pesaḥ im perush Abarabanel from Fürth, 1755. This book was also part of the Strashun Library and has been digitized; click here to view. 

The more contemporary YIVO holdings reflect many changes in the face of modernity. These include:

Let my people stay!: Hagode for an immigrant justice seder. Los Angeles : Workmen’s Circle / Arbeter Ring, 2007.

The women’s Passover companion: women’s reflections on the festival of freedom, 2003 

The freedom seder: a new Haggadah for Passover by Arthur I. Waskow, 1970. This is “an updated, radicalized version of the traditional seder text.” (This is also held by the American Jewish Historical Society.)

American Jewish Historical Society

AJHS holds the Arthur I. Waskow papers, P-152. The finding aid contains details on the collection, including how there is a folder on “Seders inspired by Waskow’s work.” Perhaps the annual Passover Seder held by President Obama should be mentioned. (For more on “the Obama Seder,” click here.)

AJHS also has an array of Haggadot encompassing both modern and traditional varieties. There are over 500 keyword matches when you search the catalog. Works that I found interesting include:

The “First American edition.” Service for the two first nights of the Passover: in Hebrew and English / According to the German & Spanish Jews. Translated into English by the late David Levi, of London, 1836.

The revised Hagada with musical notes, 1898.

Hagadah, the narrative of Israel’s redemption from Egypt: Seder ritual for Passover-eve, 1933.

The new American Haggadah Reconstructionist, 1999.

The Chassidic Haggadah: An anthology of commentary and stories for the seder, 1988.

Hagadah shel Pesah: Seder for Soviet Jewry, 1968.

Haggadah for Jews and Buddhists, 2006.

This represents just a small selection of the Haggadot that can be found in the partners’ collections here at the Center. I encourage you to explore these works and conduct your own searches of the collections (by clicking here). The Haggadot and Passover-related works housed here at the Center will prove varied and thought-provoking resources for your own Passover celebrations and reflections. 

Image: For the Child Who is Unable to Inquire, Thou Shalt Explain the Whole Story of Passover (Seder plate). Harriete Estel Berman. Steel, tin, plexiglas, sterling silver, brass. Yeshiva University Museum.
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A Newborn Girl at Passoverby Nan Cohen
Consider one apricot in a basket of them.It is very much like all the other apricots—an individual already, skin and seed.
Now think of this day. One you will probably forget.The next breath you take, a long drink of air.Holiday or not, it doesn’t matter.
A child is born and doesn’t know what day it is.The particular joy in my heart she cannot imagine.The taste of apricots is in store for her.
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[Poem from The Prentice Hall Anthology of Women’s Literature Edited by Deborah H. Holdstein, 1999]

Image: For the Child Who is Unable to Inquire, Thou Shalt Explain the Whole Story of Passover (Seder plate). Harriete Estel Berman. Steel, tin, plexiglas, sterling silver, brass. Yeshiva University Museum.

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A Newborn Girl at Passover
by Nan Cohen

Consider one apricot in a basket of them.
It is very much like all the other apricots—
an individual already, skin and seed.

Now think of this day. One you will probably forget.
The next breath you take, a long drink of air.
Holiday or not, it doesn’t matter.

A child is born and doesn’t know what day it is.
The particular joy in my heart she cannot imagine.
The taste of apricots is in store for her.

-

[Poem from The Prentice Hall Anthology of Women’s Literature Edited by Deborah H. Holdstein, 1999]

From the partners’ collections: Confirmation (Bar Mitzvah) invitation
Creator: James Spencer & Co.Object Origin: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania U.S.A. Date: January 14, 1922Medium: paper: printed, embossedPersistent URL: http://museums.cjh.org/Display.php?irn=6509Repository: Yeshiva University MuseumCall Number: 2002.061Rights statement: Click here.
Visit our Flickr photostream for more from the partners’ collections.

From the partners’ collections: Confirmation (Bar Mitzvah) invitation

Creator: James Spencer & Co.
Object Origin: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania U.S.A. 
Date: January 14, 1922
Medium: paper: printed, embossed
Persistent URL: http://museums.cjh.org/Display.php?irn=6509
Repository: Yeshiva University Museum
Call Number: 2002.061
Rights statement: Click here.

Visit our Flickr photostream for more from the partners’ collections.

From the partners’ collections: The Golden City/Upper Galilee
Description: Landscape. Camels lower left, yellow buildings top center, surrounded by green; inscribed reverse: “Ruth Bamberger with Love for Kathrin”Artist: Bamberger, Ruth, 1906-1976Medium: Painting, oil on canvasDate: 1969Persistent URL: digital.cjh.org/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=413013Repository: The Kathryn Yochelson Collection Yeshiva University MuseumAccession number: 2001.396Rights statement: Click here.
Visit our Flickr photostream for more from the partners’ collections.

From the partners’ collections: The Golden City/Upper Galilee

Description: Landscape. Camels lower left, yellow buildings top center, surrounded by green; inscribed reverse: “Ruth Bamberger with Love for Kathrin”
Artist: Bamberger, Ruth, 1906-1976
Medium: Painting, oil on canvas
Date: 1969
Persistent URL: digital.cjh.org/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=413013
Repository: The Kathryn Yochelson Collection Yeshiva University Museum
Accession number: 2001.396
Rights statement: Click here.

Visit our Flickr photostream for more from the partners’ collections.